Guestlist - Jay Fingers 4.5/5 StarsSynopsis: Juliet Feliz is bored with her life decides to pack up her life and move to New York City. She finds herself repeating the same patterns of clubbing and all that it entails, some which can be considered quite dangerous, until she meets a club promoter by the name of Napoleon Fey. Napoleon introduces Juliet to a much more exquisite level of clubs which are much more exclusive and rich. With that introduction comes a love "square" between Juliet, Napoleon, Ava (who has a crush on Napoleon) and Marcel Swann (who has it in for Ava). Can't forget the other cast of characters who add into this wild ride. Is the clubbing life as beautiful as the people who play in it or is it just as ugly as some of the things those beautiful people do?My opinion: I have to admit that I was really pleasantly surprised by this book. Due to its' subject matter, I thought I would focus on the writing styles of the author for my review, but found myself very quickly drawn into the story. The author's debut novel is fast paced and full of drama (in a positive sense) that really makes the story fly by. I think there are young adults who enjoy the clubbing lifestyle that will really get sucked into the storyline. On a side note, I must state that offensive language both swear word based and racially based really fly in this book. If you are offended by this type of language, I wouldn't recommend you read this book. It is imperative, to the storyline, that it be included in this book. Even with knowing that, there were moments that I know that even I had some difficulties. ETA (11/20/12) It is very rare that I go back and change my review once it is written, but with Guestlist, I found myself continuously thinking about this book long after I finished it. Guestlist is one of those books that if read superficially or skimmed, I think the reader will miss the depths of this book. In my opinion, like an onion with layers, it is imperative that the reader read beneath the surface and get down to the core of this novel. As I reflected on the path of the story, I saw the psychological aspects of a group of "beautiful" individuals who, beneath the surface, weren't so beautiful and how their environment gave permission to act in a destructive manner both as individuals and as a group. Do I think that this was the author's intentions? I can't say. I can only tell the reader of this review that as I reflected on this book, this was my takeaway. Source: Author for Review